ROMAN PANCRATIUM - INTRODUCTION

© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015



Ancient Greek Frescoe
Pankration Wrestlers
The pankration was a combat sport, being a blend of boxing and wrestling, originally introduced into the Greek Olympic Games in 648 BC.
The term comes from the Ancient Greek, and literally means "all powers" from 'pan' meaning "all", and 'kratos' meaning "strength" or "power" Some consider it as the first all-encompassing fighting system in human history.
It is also arguable that pankration competitions in antiquity were the closest an athletic event has come to outright, no-rules, empty hand combat.


Etruscan Wall Painting
Pankration Wrestlers
In classical mythology it was said that the heroes Heracles and Theseus invented pankration as a result of using both wrestling and boxing in their confrontations with opponents. Theseus was said to have utilized his extraordinary pankration skills to defeat the dreaded Minotaur in the Labyrinth. 
Heracles was said to have subdued the Nemean lion using pankration, and was often depicted in ancient artwork doing that.
In this context, it should be noted that pankration was also referred to as pammachon or pammachion, meaning "total combat", from 'pan', "all-" or "total", and 'mache' meaning "combat". The term pammachon was older, and would later become used less than the term pankration.


Pankration Wrestlers
Roman Relief
Roman Copy of a Hellenistic Statue
Pankration Wrestlers
The pankration was the product of the development of archaic Greek society of the seventh century BC, whereby, as the need for expression in violent sport increased, pankration filled a niche of "total contest" that neither boxing or wrestling could, however, some evidence suggests that pankration, in both its sport form and its combat form, may have been practiced in Greece already from the second millennium BC. Pankration, as practiced in historical antiquity in ancient Greece and Rome, was a combat event that combined techniques of both boxing 'pygme-/pygmachia', and wrestling 'pale', as well as additional elements, such as the use of strikes with the lower extremities, to create a broad fighting sport.

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Hellenistic Sculpture of
Pancratium Wrestlers
(with thanks to Zac)
There is evidence that, although knockouts were common, most pankration competitions were probably decided on the ground where both striking and submission techniques would freely come into play.
Pankratiasts were highly skilled grapplers and were extremely effective in applying a variety of take-downs, chokes, and punishing joint locks, however, pankration was more than just an event in the athletic competitions of the ancient world; it was also part of the arsenal of Greek and Roman soldiers – including the famous Spartan hoplites, Alexander the Great's Macedonian phalanx and Caesar's legionaries.
The feats of the ancient pankratiasts became legendary.
Stories abound of champions who were considered invincible beings. Arrhichion, Dioxippus, Polydamas of Skotoussa and Theagenes are among the most highly-recognized names.
By the Imperial Period, the Romans had adopted the Greek combat sport (spelled in Latin as pancratium) into their Games.


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'Pancratium Boy Wrestlers'
In 393 A.D. the pankration, along with gladiatorial combat and all pagan festivals, was abolished by edict of the Christian Byzantine Emperor Theodosius I.
Pankration itself was an event in the Olympic Games and in the Roman arena for some 1000 years. 
There were neither weight divisions nor time limits in pankration competitions,however, there were two or three age groups in the competitions of antiquity.

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'Pancratium Boy Wrestlers'
In the Olympic Games specifically there were only two such age groups: men (andres) and boys (paides).
The pankration event for boys was established at the Olympic Games in 200 B.C. and continued right up to Roman times.
In many pankration competitions, referees were armed with stout rods or switches to enforce the rules.


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'Horny, Naked
Pancratium Wrestlers'

In fact, there were only two rules regarding combat: contestants were allowed all except to gouge eyes or to bite.
The contest itself usually continued uninterrupted until one of the combatants submitted, was knocke-out or was killed.
Where Roman Pancrtium contests were presented to a 'fee-paying' public, the almost unavoidable sexual element was highlighted and, in addition, most contests were 'to the death'.
One unusual aspect of the Roman Pancratium was the fact that all the contestants fought completely naked and oiled - in deference to Greek athletic custom.
In addition, the Romans would often mix the 'classes' of fighters - the most popular mix being boys fighting adult males.

© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015
'Defeated Pancratium Boy Wrestler
is Raped in the Arena'
In most fights the wrestlers, of course, exhibited erections, and when slaves were used as the protagonists it was expected that the victorious and sexually aroused fighter would rape his defeated opponent before killing him.
As a result, such Pancratium contests were known colloquially, by the lower orders, as 'fuck-fights'. 
In Gracchus' arena not only were the defeated wrestlers raped (and sometimes forcibly masturbated), often more then once, but they were also effectively emasculated, after being raped, by being held by arena slaves while their victorious opponent aimed innumerable kicks and punches to the helpless fighter's exposed genitals.
After the unfortunate slave's testicles had been completely mangled and quashed by repeated punches and kicks, the defeated wrestler would finally be put out of his misery by either having his neck snapped, or being asphyxiated by slow strangulation.



© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015

'LUCIAN KNEES VINDREX IN THE BALLS'

for the full, explicit story see:



SPECIAL FEATURES: teenage red-haired boy (uncut and well-hung) - loincloths - nudity from first scene - boxing - wrestling - two rapes - two jerk-offs - extreme ball-torture (including ball pulling and kicks to the groin) - anal impaling - castration - death by strangulation and broken neck


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'TWO AGAINST ONE PANCRATIUM FIGHT'
(Ball Torture)


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'TEENAGE PANKRATIUM BOY is FUCKED in the ARENA after LOSING his FIGHT'



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'NAKED HORNY PANCRATIUM BOY CUMS AS HE IS STRANGLED'



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'WAITING FOR HIS FIGHT'



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'VICTOR and VANQUISHED I'



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'WINNER TAKES HIS REWARD'

Roman Pancratium naked wrestling - rape in the arena



© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015

'WINNER TAKES HIS REWARD'

Roman Pancratium naked wrestling - rape in the arena



© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015


'VICTOR and VANQUISHED II'

Naked and defeated - a young Pancratium boy-wrestler cums as he is fucked by his victorious opponent





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'PANCRATIUM FIGHT'



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'ROMAN BOY WRESTLERS'


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'VICTOR and VANQUISHED III'

Naked and defeated - a young Pancratium boy wrestler is raped, and then has his balls stamped on by his victorious opponent




© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015

'VICTOR of the PANCRATIUM'




© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015


'TAKEN FROM THE REAR - PANCRATIUM FIGHT'


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© Copyright Vittorio Carvelli 2015


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Roman Sexuality and the Roman Games
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NEW !

for the full story of Gracchus - and many new images go to:



'the story of Marcus Gaius Aelius - who became a slave a boy, and the favorite of the fabulously wealthy Gnaeus Octavius Gracchus.


On the death of Gracchus, Marcus was given his freedom, and inherited his master's wealth, becoming Marcus Gaius Gracchus - one of the richest men in the Empire.'

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